Finding the Perfect Running Shoe?For You

Sneaker close upin 1975 I opened my Phidippides running store in Atlanta, Georgia. Over the past 30 years, running shoes have generally improved. But because of conflicting advice and too much technical information, the best advice?.is to get the best advice. I do. I ask my staff to find me a shoe that is similar to my most successful shoes.

Ask several experienced runners about the running stores in your area. You want one that has a reputation for spending time with each customer to find a shoe that will best match the shape and function of the foot. Be prepared to spend at least 45 minutes in the store. Quality stores are often busy, and quality fitting takes time. Getting good advice can save your feet. An experienced running shoe staff can direct you toward shoes that give you a better fit, work better on your feet. I hear from runners about every week, who purchased a “great deal” but had to use it for mowing the lawn because it didn’t work on their feet.

Bring with you the most worn pair of shoes you own—walking or running.
The pattern of wear on

Why it’s Important to Invest in Good Running Shoes

106902The best running shoes are shoes that will be kind and gentle on your feet throughout any running exercise. This benefit will reflect itself in its most striking way immediately after a workout, when the way your feet feel then is a good indication of whether you have the right pair of running shoes or not. A good number of people even today still do not realize–or underestimate–the importance of investing in a good pair of running shoes. These are the kinds of people who awkwardly show up for track and field events or even light running exercises in the bulkiest pair of basketball shoes that they can find. These kinds of people are also the ones who will have massive amounts of pain in their feet right after the running exercise.

Avoid Blisters and Other Pains

If you use any kind of shoes–even ones for other types of athletic purposes–when you run, you will end up with the most sore feet ever. A further taboo is picking the incorrect kind of socks to make matters even

10 Tips for Raising a Good Sport

288x162-soccerteam-tsIn the classic “Peanuts” comic strip, woeful Charlie Brown gears up to kick the football time after time, only to find himself face down on the ground after Lucy whisks the ball away at the last minute. It’s a running joke — poor Charlie Brown never learns to hold back! But as a parent, I find it’s the hapless hero’s tormenter who captures my attention. Why is Lucy such a bad sport and — more importantly — how can we keep our kids from acting the same way? Here are 10 tips to set your kid on the path toward good sportsmanship.

  1. Explain what sportsmanship is — using kid-friendly terms. As with any behavior, the first step is to let your kids know what’s expected. Leslie Susskind, the author of “The Kids’ (and Parents’, Too!) Book of Good Sportsmanship,” describes sportsmanship as an extension of the golden rule. “It’s treating others the way you want to be treated,” she says. Simply put: if you don’t want the football moved when you kick it, don’t move it for someone else.
  2. Be a role model on

Become a Better Softball Coach

To do this, you will need to take advantage of the many different tools and resources that are out there for coaches to use. One amazing form of softball instruction comes from studying the players as they perform. With the correct technology, you will be able to do this and really make a difference for your team.

The Needs of the Many

For a team to work in unison, it has to be known how, exactly, the team works in the first place. While the untrained eye might not be able to notice the interactions of players coming together to form a unit, a professional coach will be able to spot some of the more obvious signs. Still, there is a lot going on when a team is practicing, and this can be hard for one person to take in without help. Using the right technology, it is possible for you to record a game so that you can analyze it later. While a video camera might have been useful for this in the past, nowadays there are much better pieces of equipment available to make

Choose Your Baseball bat Carefully While Shopping Online

When your child is showing some talent and passion in Baseball, you will always try to provide everything to him or her so that he or she can reach the top of the game. Getting the proper baseball gear for your child is the first step if you want him or her to fulfill their dream. As we all know that kids are always growing and, therefore, the baseball gear needs to be purchased frequently to fit him as per the level of body growth. However purchasing the baseball gear at frequent intervals can be a little costly or it can go out of your budget. Therefore, you need a place where you will get quality baseball gear such as baseball bats and that too at reasonable process. If you are looking for the lowest price baseballs bats, then you can try to find them in this online store. This store is specialized in quality baseball bats and you can purchase them online so that you will not only save your money but also your time. You can opt for aluminum or wooden bat as per the requirement and the health of your child. If the

Are You Aware of the New Baseball Netting Recommendations for 2016

New baseball netting recommendations will be rolled out by the Major League Baseball (MLB) at the start of the 2016 season. Although this offers fans some protection, it is clearly not enough. Several instances of spectators being injured by foul balls at MLB games in 2015 led the sports body to take steps to improve safety in the ballpark. Many venues previously replaced the old cyclone fence with netting to provide watchers with a clearer view of the action.

A New York Times article  at the end of last year outlined some of the changes announced by Commissioner Rob Manfred. As per the new policy:

  • Baseball teams are  encouraged to extend protective netting behind the home plate by 70 feet or so down the foul lines, to the near ends of both dugouts
  • Teams must find ways to educate fans about the dangers of sitting too close
  • Teams and ticket vendors must also make clear to the fans which seats are protected at the time of ticket sales

Despite these changes, some sports enthusiasts are of the opinion that the new policy will make little impact. For one, the

A Quick Guide to Selecting Your Baseball Benches

Are you planning to buy a new seating for your baseball field? There is more to it than a frame and slats that you stick into the ground. There are many different styles and mounting options out there which may end up leaving you confused.  Read our quick guide to help you consider the most essential aspects during your buying process. After all, your goal is to provide the players on your field and their fans with the best game experience.

  • Material, color and finish: This impacts aesthetics as well as your maintenance routine.  Aluminum has a considerable advantage over other materials. It is light and can be easily moved around. It is also durable and becomes virtually-maintenance free when you add a weather-resistant coating. You have a range of colors available to choose from.
  • Style: Do you want a bench with a backrest, with or without a shelf, prefer one that is without a backrest, or need a scorer’s table? If you want to provide your players and fans with enhanced comfort, benches with backrests are ideal. A scorer’s table, on the other hand, offers a convenient

Study examines incidence of concussion in youth, high school, college football

A slight majority of concussions happened during youth football games but most concussions at the high school and college levels occurred during practice, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.

Football is a popular youth sport with approximately 3 million youth athletes, 1.1 million high school athletes and 100,000 college athletes playing tackle football each year. A report on concussion by the Institute of Medicine highlighted the need for more extensive data on incidence in athletes from youth to college.

Thomas P. Dompier, Ph.D., A.T.C., of the Datalys Center for Sports Injury Research and Prevention Inc., Indianapolis, and coauthors used data collected as part of three large injury surveillance systems: the Youth Football Surveillance System included 118 youth football teams, providing 4,092 athlete seasons (one player participating in one season); the National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network included 96 secondary school football programs, providing 11,957 athlete-seasons; and the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program included 24 member institutions, providing 4,305 athlete-seasons.

The study found that during the 2012 and 2013 seasons there were 1,198 concussions reported with 141 (11.8 percent) of them in youth athletes, 795 (66.4 percent) in high school athletes and 262 (21.9 percent)

The American Academy of Pediatrics tackles youth football injuries

With football remaining one of the most popular sports for children and teens, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is issuing new recommendations to improve the safety of all players while on the field. In a policy statement announced at its National Conference & Exhibition taking place in Washington DC., the AAP recommends:

  • Officials and coaches must enforce the rules of proper tackling, including zero tolerance for illegal, head-first hits;
  • Players must decide whether the benefits of playing outweigh the risks of possible injury;
  • Non-tackling leagues should be expanded so athletes can choose to participate without the injury risks associated with tackling;
  • Skilled athletic trainers should be available on the sidelines, as evidence shows they can reduce the number of injuries for players.

Delaying the introduction of tackling until a certain age may reduce the risk of injury for ages when tackling is prohibited, but this could lead to even higher rates of injury when tackling is later introduced if players have their first tackling experiences when they are older, stronger and bigger, according to the AAP.

“It’s this paradox,” says pediatrician Greg Landry, MD, FAAP, “that makes it so important for leagues to teach proper tackling technique and skills to avoid and

Helmetless tackling drills significantly reduce head impact

The national debate around football-related head impacts, and their relationship to concussions and spinal injuries, continues to raise concern in the United States. Sparked by efforts to help make the sport safer for players, research at the University of New Hampshire has found that a novel set of helmetless-tackling drills are effective in reducing head impacts by 28 percent in one season.

The study, conducted by Erik Swartz, professor and chair of the department of kinesiology at UNH, was released early online and will be published in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

Research findings are for the first year of a two-year study that tested helmetless-tackling drills and their effectiveness in reducing head impact in 50 football players at the University of New Hampshire, a NCAA Division I team. The purpose was to see if this innovative technique, called the HuTTTM intervention program, could alter tackling behavior and ultimately reduce head injury exposure.

“The idea of taking off the football helmet during practice to reduce head impact may seem counterintuitive to the sport,” said Swartz. “But the findings show that preventing head impacts, which can contribute to spine and head injuries like concussions, may be found

Rise in lower extremity injuries possible result of new concussion prevention rules

NCAA tackling rule changes that penalize head to head contact, and encourage tackling of the lower extremity have had some proven impacts in collegiate football. However, according to researchers presenting their work at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Specialty Day, an unintended consequence of these rule changes may be higher rates of knee, ankle and thigh injuries.

“Nearly a third of all concussions in collegiate athletics occur during football. With the relatively recent rule changes, concussion rates have not decreased. Our analysis of the NCAA Injury Surveillance Database though noted increased rates of ankle and knee injuries, which may result in osteoarthritis and disability issues later in life for these athletes,” said lead author, Robert Westermann, MD from the University of Iowa. “Athletes may be making contact lower on the body, to avoid the head-to-head contact and thus stiffer game penalties.”

Westermann and his team looked at the NCAA Injury Surveillance Database for 57 programs and compared injury rate ratios between 2009/10-2011/12 and after new rules to reduce head to head tacking between the 2012/13-2014/15 seasons. Lower extremity injuries (i.e. hip/groin, upper leg/thigh, knee, lower leg/Achilles, foot/toes) and sports-related concussions were examined. The data for the

Why Play Bingo

People play bingo, because its fun, bingo is to play. If it’s not fun to play the game, he would not play. However, many people simply enjoy playing bingo, as growth of the online bingo industry. It expands on the domestic markets that sites are always available in other languages.

It is very difficult to find good bingo sites and trusted as a simple search begins many options. These portals offer players a systematic breakdown of the advantages and disadvantages of the location, which makes the decision process much easier for them. These sites also have sections exclusively boats that go a long way in deciding the players to play and that a dedicated pages giving Mississippi

So with the aid in question, win prizes bingo sites is a likely possibility. Earn big money by Jackpots is now very much a reality that can be achieved with a little research, a little vigilance and a lot of bingo games.

Most people tell you not to play bingo for real money. For most, this is not a game that most people get rich, but not his goal to play. You play the game because they love it. Bingo is to

Helmetless tackling drills significantly reduce head impact

The national debate around football-related head impacts, and their relationship to concussions and spinal injuries, continues to raise concern in the United States. Sparked by efforts to help make the sport safer for players, research at the University of New Hampshire has found that a novel set of helmetless-tackling drills are effective in reducing head impacts by 28 percent in one season.

The study, conducted by Erik Swartz, professor and chair of the department of kinesiology at UNH, was released early online and will be published in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

Research findings are for the first year of a two-year study that tested helmetless-tackling drills and their effectiveness in reducing head impact in 50 football players at the University of New Hampshire, a NCAA Division I team. The purpose was to see if this innovative technique, called the HuTTTM intervention program, could alter tackling behavior and ultimately reduce head injury exposure.

“The idea of taking off the football helmet during practice to reduce head impact may seem counterintuitive to the sport,” said Swartz. “But the findings show that preventing head impacts, which can contribute to spine

Helmetless-tackling drills significantly reduce head impact

The national debate around football-related head impacts, and their relationship to concussions and spinal injuries, continues to raise concern in the United States. Sparked by efforts to help make the sport safer for players, research at the University of New Hampshire has found that a novel set of helmetless-tackling drills are effective in reducing head impacts by 28 percent in one season.

The study, conducted by Erik Swartz, professor and chair of the department of kinesiology at UNH, was released early online and will be published in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

Research findings are for the first year of a two-year study that tested helmetless-tackling drills and their effectiveness in reducing head impact in 50 football players at the University of New Hampshire, a NCAA Division I team. The purpose was to see if this innovative technique, called the HuTTTM intervention program, could alter tackling behavior and ultimately reduce head injury exposure.

“The idea of taking off the football helmet during practice to reduce head impact may seem counterintuitive to the sport,” said Swartz. “But the findings show that preventing head impacts, which can contribute to spine

Jerry Kramer’s Super Bowl I ring sells for $125K at auction

Former Packers offensive lineman Jerry Kramer has sold his ring from the first Super Bowl for more than $125,000.

Green Bay Press-Gazette Media reported the ring was among more than 50 items from Kramer that were auctioned Saturday night through Heritage Auctions. Kramer’s game-used jersey from Super Bowl I sold for more than $45,000.

Kramer, who turned 80 in January, played with Green Bay in the 1960s. He said he’s selling the items to clear his house of things he doesn’t need and plans to use the money to create a college fund for his five grandchildren.

Proceeds from the auction were expected to be about $350,000 by the end of the weekend.

Kramer declined to sell his Super Bowl II ring, saying it means too much to him.

At the time, it seemed as though the Baltimore Ravens were making the right decision when they extended the contract of defensive back Lardarius Webb and gave new deals to keep offensive tackle Eugene Monroe and tight end Dennis Pitta.

Now all three of those contracts fall in the category of buyer’s remorse. Those deals rival Joe Flacco’s monstrous cap number as the reasons Baltimore has the second-worst cap situation in the NFL.

According to the ESPN roster

Victory For the Broncos

On Sunday night, the Denver Broncos beat the Carolina Panthers 24-10 to win football’s biggest contest. The match-up’s Most Valuable Player (MVP) award went to Broncos’ linebacker Von Miller. His forced fumbles paved the way for victory, and helped give teammate Peyton Manning the second Super Bowl win of his career. (Manning’s first win was with the Indianapolis Colts.)

Teamwork meant everything to Manning. After the game, he praised Miller and the Broncos’ entire defensive line.“Whenever you’re doing something for your buddies, it means a little bit more,” Miller said. “As human beings, we’re selfish, but when you’re doing something for somebody else, that’s when the magic happens.”

“I certainly knew that (with) this defense, this team would have a chance,” Manning told the Associated Press. “Our defense has just been, from the get-go, they’ve been nothing but awesome. Being hurt and struggling early in the season wasn’t a lot of fun so I was grateful to get back healthy and to try and play my part these last couple of weeks.”

The Last Hurrah?

“All signs point to retirement,” says TIME’s Sean Gregory. “He’s played for 18 seasons . . . and now he can leave the game on top, with a second

You Don’t Have to Be Athletic to Participate in Professional Sports

So, you want a career in sports but can’t throw a ball, sink a basket or make a tackle to save your life. What do you do? You get creative. There are dozens of jobs in the sports industry that have nothing to do with getting geared up and running across a field. If you want to work in sports but aren’t blessed with cat-like reflexes or the ability to run a two-minute mile, here are a few jobs that you may enjoy:

  1. Broadcasting

If you take athletes out of the equation, broadcasters are perhaps the best-known figures in professional sports. You can give fans a play-by-play of the game from behind a microphone in the best seat in the house. You may broadcast over the radio, the television or even the web. If you have a knack for speaking and love sports more than the average fan, broadcasting may be the perfect job for you.

  1. Public Relations

We’ve all seen famous athletes in the news doing things they’d rather not be remembered for. If you have a knack for the spin, a career as a public relations manager may be a good fit. These professionals ensure that a team and its players are

3 Sports Psychology Tips for Parents and Coaches

As youth sports psychology experts, we often work very closely with parents and coaches when we provide mental coaching for young athletes. Parents and coaches who are knowledgeable about “mental game” challenges and strategies are better equipped to instill confidence in their young athletes.

If you are a sports parent or coach, you’ll want to learn how to improve your athletes’ mental game so they can get the most out of their skills in competition.

Here’s just one example of how coaches and parents can improve athletes’ mental toughness using proven mental game strategies.

Sports Psychology Tip No.1: Lower Expectations

You might not know that coaches’ and parents’ high expectations for their kids can cause kids to feel pressured. Parents and coaches sometimes impose their own expectations on their kids, with the intended goal of boosting kids’ confidence. But often, this has the opposite effect.

When working with softball and baseball parents, for example, we help parents and athletes understand that strict expectations—parents’ demands about how their kids should perform—actually hurt kids’ performance.

Athletes who have high levels of self-confidence end up in the winner’s circle. You want your athletes to feel

Sneakers

Sneakers (also known as athletic shoes, tennis shoes, or trainers) are shoes primarily designed for sports or other forms of physical exercise. Sneakers have evolved to be used for casual everyday activities. The term generally describes a type of footwear with a flexible sole made of rubber or synthetic material and an upper part made of leather or synthetic materials. Examples of such shoes include athletic footwear such as: basketball shoes, tennis shoes, cross trainers and other shoes worn for specific sports.1 Names and etymology

  • 2 History
  • 3 Use in sports
  • 4 Notable brands
  • 5 Types and number of models
  • 6 Sneaker culture
  • 7 See also
  • 8 References
  • “Sneakers” is the more common term used in the Northeastern United States and southern Florida.[1] The term is also used in North Carolina. The British English equivalent of “sneaker” in its modern form is “trainer“. In some urban areas in the United States, the slang for sneakers is kicks. Other terms include training shoes or trainers (British English), sandshoes, gym boots or joggers Geordie